• The combat is sleek, stylish, feels natural and makes multi-classing and busting out combos so effortless that it feels like playing Devil May Cry – but with Dante kicking the shit out of gnomes instead of demons (so satisfying). In Dragon Age, the combat has been a bit clunky and unresponsive at times, and definitely a bit class prejudiced in certain scenarios. While this works to make the DA series feel more strategic, on the whole the uninterrupted flow and challenge of Amalur’s combat feels superior.
  • Amalur’s crafting system offers players the opportunity to not only multiclass to their hearts’ content, but also gives them the option of making use of various crafting materials by forging their own potions, weapons, enchantments and other such niceties to match their individual play style.
  • Like in Skyrim, you can actually have multiple player homes across the world that are tailored according to what you want in them and what sort of crafting you’d like to be available. This makes the travelling aspect a lot more fun for me. It continues to immerse me in my character, both in earning the homes and the exploration to return to them after an epic battle with a Spider Queen.
  • Again, taking from Skyrim, there are a ton of side-quests and faction quests to be done outside of the main story that help build the world. From helping a love-sick fisherman realize his wife is not what he thought, to uncovering a prejudiced cult in a nice, quiet little town, these quests give the whole experience a much greater sense of depth.