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Gaming Museum Aims To Change Attitudes Towards Gaming

The National Videogame Museum in Sheffield, UK, has opened its doors in an effort to appeal to gamers and non-gamers alike. The museum is hoping it can change some of the negative stereotypes associated with gaming and foster a much wider appreciation among the public.

To most gamers, sitting down for a couple of ours of immersive entertainment is simply a way to relax and have fun. It’s harmless escapism, indulging in the creativity other haves designed, either with friends or alone.

Sadly gamers still don’t have the greatest reputation in the eyes of the public. Gamers can be incorrectly perceived as a subculture of awkward, potentially hostile gatekeepers, who despite having an Xbox Live subscription, do not play well with others.

Of course the truth is most gamers are civilized and artistic people, who enjoy many forms of entertainment, gaming just happens to be one of them. The trolls are in the minority, but situations like Gamer-Gate and other controversies have not helped the reputation of gamers and gaming in general.

In an interview with the Sheffield Star, the Museum’s Communications Manager said,“There has been a bit of negative discussion relating to videogames recently, which has only reaffirmed our mission to create an accessible and inclusive space for those who love videogames. That we’re currently busier than we’ve ever been demonstrates that the public is eager to learn about videogame culture, and discover the educational and cultural value of games.”

The staff at the museum hope that videogames will one stay stand alongside books and movies as a legitimate form of art, but gamers are let down by a “few bad eggs”.

Incredibly the museum has made an excellent impression on the people of Sheffield since opening this summer and has had 250,000 visitors. Many of which have travelled to the city just to see the museum.

“That we’re currently busier than we’ve ever been demonstrates that the public is eager to learn about videogame culture, and discover the educational and cultural value of games.”

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