Opinion PS4 PS5

Why Did Sony Remove Cyberpunk 2077 From the PlayStation Store?

why-did-sony-remove-cyberpunk-2077-from-the-playstation-store

Last week, you probably picked up on the fact that Sony took the step to remove Cyberpunk 2077 from the PlayStation Store. This is an unprecedented move, the likes of which I haven’t actually seen before. There have been so many games that launched in a buggy or underwhelming state. Sony never removed them, so what pushed them to make the decision to remove this, the biggest release of 2020, from their storefront. It’s going to cost them a lot of money, and Microsoft doesn’t seem to be doing the same, so why on Earth would Sony do this to themselves?

I think the crux of the matter lies in Sony’s refund policies and the fact that Cyberpunk 2077 is so damn buggy. To date I’ve seen bugs that throw cars into the air, make NPCs walk through walls, and even just pee freely in the street as they walk past you. There’s no denying that this game is full of bugs. The core story content, and the RPG stuff, is great, but it feels like a game that needed at least one more year to get up to par.

Enter Sony. They’re receiving hundreds of refund requests for this game on their digital storefront, and they’re not happy about it. According to their refund policy, you can get a refund within 14 days of purchasing the game, which also applies if you pre-ordered it at least 14 days before its release date. Considering that there were 8 million pre-orders, I think that includes most people who purchased the game. The thing is, all those players who have purchased the game outside of that can’t get a refund, and they’re due one given the state of the game.

I think that Sony has removed the game so that they don’t have to deal with more refund requests. That’s the bottom line. This is a company that is notoriously difficult to get a refund out of, so it doesn’t surprise me in the slightest that they’re trying to make getting a refund out of them as hard as possible. With that said, it’s their storefront. They probably don’t want a buggy game that sells one minute and generates a refund request the next minute.

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